IMMH

Pressetexte

Hamburg, 3 November 2021

Opening of the special exhibition „HAMBURG SÜD – 150 years on the world’s oceans“ on 4 November 2021 at the International Maritime Museum Hamburg, with extended opening hours

On 4 November, the founding day of Hamburg Süd, the long-awaited special exhibition „HAMBURG SÜD – 150 years on the world’s oceans“ will open at the International Maritime Museum Hamburg (IMMH). On this day, the museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

On deck 1 of the IMMH, the history of this important shipping company is presented in five chronological sections from its foundation in 1871 to the present. On display are, among other things, Hamburg Süd’s foundation charter, the special treaty with Emperor Dom Pedro II of Brazil from 1888, various historical ship models showing the development of modern merchant shipping, paintings never before on public display, posters of a wide variety of passenger ship voyages from four decades, photo albums, audio and video material and, as a „small“ highlight, the history of Hamburg Süd on a timeline using miniature ship models.

In 2019, Hamburg Süd and the IMMH agreed on a cooperation for the development and presentation of the shipping company’s historical collection. The aim of this cooperation is to make the history of Hamburg Süd, founded in 1871, accessible to a broad public as a permanent exhibition using ship models, pictures, posters and handwritten documents as well as other exhibits.

The special exhibition on the 150th anniversary of Hamburg Süd will be on display at the IMMH for ten months, until 11 September 2022. It will be accompanied by regular guided tours, for which registration is required. The exhibition will then travel to South America, where it will be on display at Hamburg Süd’s historic locations in Argentina and Brazil.

The preparatory work, which took several years, and the exhibitions in the International Maritime Museum Hamburg were made possible by a sponsorship of Dr. August Oetker KG, Bielefeld. Hamburg Süd was owned by the Oetker family for more than eight decades until its sale to the Danish Maersk Group at the end of 2017.


The most important milestones in Hamburg Süd’s history in chronological order:


Foundation and consolidation
1871-1918

On November 4, 1871, representatives of reputable Hamburg trading houses met to found the „Hamburg-Südamerikanische Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft”. Among them were Heinrich Amsinck, Carl Woermann and Ferdinand Laeisz. The purpose of the new company was to establish regular shipping connections between Hamburg and Brazil as well as the La Plata states. With initially three ships, a monthly service was opened from Hamburg via Lisbon to Rio de Janeiro, Bahia, and Santos. In 1888, the shipping company had achieved such importance for the Brazilian economy that Emperor Dom Pedro II guaranteed her freedom of movement and extensive freedom of action in Brazilian waters by contract. The main cargoes of the Hamburg Süd ships returning to Europe from the East Coast of South America at this time were coffee and meat. However, the shipping company also relied on the carriage of passengers. The passengers were initially seasonal workers from Spain and Portugal, and later also emigrants from Germany. At the beginning of the 20th century, there was a new way of traveling. Wealthy customers expected the same level of comfort on board ship as in the famous luxury hotels. The size and equipment of the ships became a selling point. This marked the beginning of the age of large fast steamers that were almost exclusively designed to carry passengers. On the eve of the First World War, the Hamburg Süd fleet comprised 61 ships. Its outbreak hit the German shipping companies hard.

Interwar period and World War II
1919 to 1945

After the First World War, German shipowners had to start practically from scratch: All ships over 1,600 GRT were confiscated by the Allies. In 1920, Hamburg Süd resumed its activities with three sailing schooners and several charter ships. As early as 1922, with the maiden voyage of the „Cap Polonio“, Hamburg Süd ushered in a glamorous era of cruising. She was the largest and most luxurious ship on the South Atlantic route. Hamburg Süd was open-minded about new technologies and when the diesel engine became available as an alternative to steam propulsion, the shipping company immediately decided to use it. The “Monte Sarmiento” was Hamburg Süd’s first passenger ship with this new propulsion system in 1924. Due to its success, Hamburg Süd decided to build further new ships, including the “Cap Arcona II”, which was put into service on November 19, 1927 as the new flagship of the passenger fleet. From 1929 onwards, the global economic crisis was another setback for the German shipping companies. The recovery was difficult. In 1936, Richard Kaselowsky, the stepfather of Rudolf August Oetker, took over a 25 percent share package in Hamburg Süd for the company Dr. August Oetker, Bielefeld. His involvement and influence contributed significantly to the recovery of the company. But the Second World War soon plunged the shipping company into the next disaster. A particularly tragic fate befell the „Cap Arcona II“, which was sunk by British fighter-bombers on May 3, 1945 with almost 5,000 concentration camp prisoners on board.

Reconstruction and the economic miracle
1946 to 1969

The end of the Second World War again meant the total loss of its fleet for Hamburg Süd. Not until five years later the shipping and shipbuilding restrictions were eased to such an extent that reconstruction could be considered. On the initiative of Rudolf August Oetker, who had been appointed to the shipping company’s supervisory board in 1942, four modern motor ships of the so-called “Santa” class were ordered in 1950. The year 1951 also saw the resumption of liner service to the South American East Coast. Hamburg Süd was also converted from a joint stock company into a limited partnership. The company Dr. August Oetker took a 49.4 per cent share in the company’s capital. The Marshall Plan and the economic miracle soon allowed the young Federal Republic of Germany to flourish, and Hamburg Süd also expanded rapidly. The year 1955 was a landmark year for the company. Rudolf August Oetker merged all of the company’s deposits into the OHG Dr. August Oetker. A shipbuilding highlight was the construction of the much admired six „Cap San“ ships. These ships, designed by the famous architect Cäsar Pinnau, were quickly given the nickname: „The White Swans of the South Atlantic“. The „Cap San“ ships came into service in 1961/62 and were both classic general cargo and reefer ships in one. As the last ship of its class, the restored and seaworthy „Cap San Diego“ can still be seen today as a museum ship at the Überseebrücke in Hamburg.

Containerisation and takeovers
1970-1996

When the first containers were unloaded in German ports in the mid-1960s, the industry was rather sceptical. Hamburg Süd was convinced of the triumph of the standardised box right from the start. Columbus Line, the North American subsidiary of Hamburg Süd, offered container services between North America and Australia/New Zealand as early as 1971. Containerisation in the Pacific began with three full container ships, the „Columbus New Zealand“, the „Columbus Australia“ and the „Columbus America“. Containerisation in the service between Europe and the East Coast of South America began in 1980 with the freighters „Monte Olivia“ and „Monte Sarmiento“, which were specially converted for container transport. The 1980s also marked the beginning of an intensive expansion policy of Hamburg Süd with numerous takeovers of liner services. The beginning was made in 1986 with the takeover of the last shares of Deutsche Nah-Ost-Linien and the acquisition of a 50 per cent share in the Spanish line Ybarra y Cia, Sudamerica SA, Seville, with which Hamburg Süd secured access from the Mediterranean to the East Coast of South America. Four years later, the Rotterdam Zuid-America Lijn (RZAL) and the associated Havenlijn were purchased. The English Furness Withy Group was taken over in October 1990. With this step, Hamburg Süd established itself in the trades from Europe to the West Coast of South America, to the East Coast of Central America and the Caribbean. In 1991 the Swedish shipping company Laser Lines was acquired, which helped to strengthen the company’s presence in the Caribbean and the West Coast of South America.

Globalization and growth
1997 to 2021

In order to further expand its good market position in its trade lanes, the Hamburg Süd Group took over further well-known liner activities from 1997 onwards. These included South Seas Steamship and South Pacific Container Lines in the South Pacific (1999), the liner activities of the Brazilian Transroll between Europe and the East Coast of South America (1999), and the Inter-America services of the American shipping company Crowley American Transport in 2000. The Brazilian shipping company Aliança, which was taken over in 1998, played a special role. Aliança is the leader in cabotage, that means the transport between Brazilian ports reserved for ships flying the Brazilian flag. This was followed in 2003 by the acquisition of the liner services to the Eastern Mediterranean and India/Pakistan operated under the brand name Ellerman, as well as the acquisition of the liner activities of Kien Hung in the Asia-South America trade, and to South and West Africa. This was followed in 2006 by the acquisition of Fesco’s cross trade activities between Australia/New Zealand and Asia and North America under the name FANZL Fesco Australia New Zealand Liner Services. At the end of 2007, Hamburg Süd took over the liner activities of Costa Container Lines from the Mediterranean to the South American East and North Coast, to Central America as well as to the Caribbean, Canada and Cuba. In 2014, the shipping group entered the trade between Asia, Northern Europe and the Western Mediterranean, as well as Asia and North America. In the first quarter of 2015, the expansion strategy was continued with the acquisition of the container liner services of Chilena de Navegación Interoceánica S.A. (CCNI) between the West Coast of South America and Asia, Europe and North America. In the market, the Hamburg Süd Group was most recently present on the world’s oceans with container liner services (110 vessels) and in tramp shipping (60 vessels). At the same time, numerous economically and ecologically effective measures were implemented in the construction of new ships, contributing to lower fuel consumption and a reduction in emissions. Not only as a result of the acquisitions, but also due to targeted, organic growth, Hamburg Süd was one of the ten largest container shipping companies in the world in 2016 and was Germany’s second largest shipping company until its sale to the Danish Maersk Group at the end of 2017. Over the last two years, RAO’s tanker activities have been discontinued, while the dry bulk activities of RAO (Hamburg), Furness Withy (London and Melbourne) and Aliança Navegação e Logística (Rio de Janeiro) have been sold to China Navigation Company (CNCo), a subsidiary of the Swire Group. In 2021, Hamburg Süd continues its strategic focus on container logistics and sells Hamburg Süd Reiseagentur to the UK-based ATPI Group, a global leader in business travel.

If you have any queries, please contact:

International Maritime Museum Hamburg

Eva Graumann

Phone +49 40 300 92 30-95

E-mail: e.graumann.extern@imm-hamburg.de

or

International Maritime Museum Hamburg

Antje Reineward

Tel. + 49 40 300 92 30-14
E-mail: a.reineward@imm-hamburg.de


Hamburg, 3. November 2021

Eröffnung der Sonderausstellung „HAMBURG SÜD – 150 Jahre auf den Weltmeeren“ am 4. November 2021 im Internationalen Maritimen Museum Hamburg mit verlängerten Öffnungszeiten

Am 4. November, dem Gründungstag der Hamburg Süd, wird im Internationalen Maritimen Museum Hamburg (IMMH) die lang erwartete Sonderausstellung „HAMBURG SÜD – 150 Jahre auf den Weltmeeren“ eröffnet. An diesem Tag ist das Museum von 10 Uhr bis 20 Uhr geöffnet.

Auf Deck 1 des IMMH wird in fünf zeitlichen Abschnitten von der Gründung 1871 bis zur Gegenwart die Geschichte dieser bedeutenden Reederei dargestellt. Präsentiert werden u.a. die Gründungsurkunde der Hamburg Süd, der Sondervertrag mit Kaiser Dom Pedro II von Brasilien aus dem Jahr 1888, verschiedene historische Schiffsmodelle, die die Entwicklung der modernen Handelsschifffahrt aufzeigen, bisher nie öffentlich gezeigte Gemälde, Plakate der unterschiedlichsten Passagierschiffsreisen aus vier Jahrzehnten, Fotoalben, Audio und Videomaterial und als „kleines“ Highlight die Geschichte der Hamburg Süd auf einem Zeitstrahl anhand von Miniaturschiffsmodellen.

Im Jahr 2019 hatten die Hamburg Süd und das IMMH eine Kooperation für die Erschließung und Präsentation der historischen Sammlung der Reederei beschlossen. Ziel dieser Kooperation ist es, die Geschichte der 1871 gegründeten Hamburg Süd anhand von Schiffsmodellen, Bildern, Plakaten und Schriftstücken sowie weiteren Exponaten als Dauerausstellung einem breiten Publikum zugänglich zu machen.

Die Sonderausstellung zum 150-jährigen Jubiläum der Hamburg Süd wird zehn Monate, bis zum 11. September 2022 im IMMH zu sehen sein. Sie wird begleitet durch regelmäßige Führungen, für die eine Anmeldung erforderlich ist. Anschließend geht die Ausstellung auf Reisen nach Südamerika, wo sie an geschichtsträchtigen Orten der Hamburg Süd in Argentinien und Brasilien zu sehen sein wird.

Ermöglicht wurden die mehrjährigen Vorarbeiten und die Ausstellungen im Internationalen Maritimen Museum Hamburg durch eine Förderung der Dr. August Oetker KG, Bielefeld. Die Hamburg Süd befand sich mehr als acht Jahrzehnte, bis zu ihrem Verkauf Ende 2017 an die dänische Maersk Gruppe, im Besitz der Familie Oetker.

Die wichtigsten Eckpunkte der Geschichte der Hamburg Süd in zeitlicher Abfolge:

Gründung und Konsolidierung
1871 – 1918

Am 4. November 1871 fanden sich 11 Repräsentanten angesehener Hamburger Handelshäuser zusammen, um die „Hamburg-Südamerikanische Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft“ zu gründen. Unter ihnen Heinrich Amsinck, Carl Woermann und Ferdinand Laeisz. Zweck der neuen Gesellschaft war eine regelmäßige Schiffsverbindung zwischen Hamburg und Brasilien sowie den La Plata-Staaten. Mit zunächst drei Schiffen wurde ein monatlicher Dienst von Hamburg über Lissabon nach Rio de Janeiro, Bahia und Santos eröffnet. 1888 hatte die Reederei für die brasilianische Wirtschaft eine derartige Bedeutung erreicht, dass Kaiser Dom Pedro II., ihr in einem Vertrag Bewegungs- und weitgehende Handlungsfreiheit in brasilianischen Gewässern zusicherte. Hauptladungsgüter der von der südamerikanischen Ostküste nach Europa zurückkehrenden Hamburg Süd-Schiffe waren in dieser Zeit Kaffee und Fleisch. Jedoch setzte die Reederei auch auf die Beförderung von Passagieren. Die Passagiere waren zunächst Saisonarbeiter aus Spanien und Portugal, später auch Auswanderer aus Deutschland. Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts wurde dann auf neue Art gereist. Zahlungskräftige Kunden erwarteten auf den Schiffen den gleichen Komfort, wie in den berühmten Luxushotels. Größe und Ausstattung der Schiffe wurden zum Verkaufsargument. Damit begann das Zeitalter großer Schnelldampfer, die fast ausschließlich auf die Beförderung von Passagieren ausgerichtet waren. Am Vorabend des Ersten Weltkriegs umfasste die Flotte der Hamburg Süd 61 Schiffe. Sein Ausbruch traf die Deutschen Reedereien schwer.

Zwischenkriegszeit und Zweiter Weltkrieg
1919 bis 1945

Nach dem ersten Weltkrieg mussten die deutschen Reeder praktisch bei null anfangen: Sämtliche Schiffe über 1.600 BRT wurden von den Alliierten beschlagnahmt. Im Jahr 1920 nahm die Hamburg Süd mit drei Segelschonern und einigen Charterschiffen ihre Tätigkeit wieder auf. Bereits 1922 läutete sie mit der Jungfernreise der „Cap Polonio“ eine glanzvolle Ära der Kreuzfahrt ein. Das Schiff war das luxuriöseste und größte Schiff auf der Südatlantik-Route. Die Hamburg Süd war aufgeschlossen gegenüber neuen Technologien und als mit dem Dieselmotor eine

Alternative zum Dampfantrieb verfügbar war, entschloss sich die Reederei sofort zu deren Einsatz. Die „Monte Sarmiento“ war 1924 das erste Passagierschiff der Hamburg Süd mit diesem neuen

Antrieb. Aufgrund ihres Erfolges entschloss sich die Hamburg Süd zu weiteren Neubauten, darunter auch die „Cap Arcona II“, die am 19. November 1927 als neues Flaggschiff der Passagierflotte in Dienst gestellt wurde. Die Weltwirtschaftskrise war dann ab 1929 ein erneuter Rückschlag für die Deutschen Reedereien. Die Erholung verlief mühsam. 1936 übernahm Richard Kaselowsky, der Stiefvater von Rudolf August Oetker, ein 25-prozentiges Aktienpaket der Hamburg Süd für die Firma Dr. August Oetker, Bielefeld. Seine Beteiligung und sein Einfluss trugen maßgeblich zur Gesundung des Unternehmens bei. Doch der Zweite Weltkrieg stürzte die Reederei bald in die nächste Katastrophe. Ein besonders tragisches Schicksal ereilte dabei die „Cap Arcona II“, die am 3. Mai 1945 mit fast 5.000 KZ-Häftlingen an Bord von britischen Jagdbombern versenkt wurde.

Wiederaufbau und Wirtschaftswunder
1946 bis 1969

Das Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs bedeutete für die Hamburg Süd erneut den Totalverlust ihrer Flotte. Erst nach fünf Jahren wurden die Schifffahrts- und Schiffsbaubeschränkungen so weit gelockert, dass an Wiederaufbau zu denken war. Auf Initiative von Rudolf August Oetker, der 1942 in den Aufsichtsrat der Reederei berufen wurde, wurden 1950 vier moderne Motorschiffe der so genannten „Santa“-Klasse bestellt. Das Jahr 1951 brachte auch die Wiederaufnahme des Liniendienstes zur Südamerika Ostküste. Ebenso wurde die Hamburg Süd von einer Aktiengesellschaft in eine Kommanditgesellschaft umgewandelt. Am Firmenkapital beteiligte sich die Firma Dr. Rudolf August Oetker mit 49,4 Prozent. Marshall-Plan und Wirtschaftswunder ließen die junge Bundesrepublik bald wieder aufblühen und auch bei der Hamburg Süd folgte eine schnelle Expansion. Richtungsweisend für das Unternehmen wurde das Jahr 1955. Rudolf August Oetker vereinigte sämtliche Einlagen der Firma auf die OHG Dr. August Oetker. Ein schiffbaulicher Höhepunkt war der Bau der viel bewunderten sechs „Cap San“-Schiffe. Diese von dem berühmten Architekten Cäsar Pinnau gestalteten Schiffe, erhielten schnell den Beinamen: „Die weißen Schwäne des Südatlantik“. Die „Cap San“-Schiffe kamen 1961/62 in Fahrt und waren klassische Stückgut- und Kühlschiffe in einem. Als letztes Schiff dieser Klasse kann heute noch die restaurierte und seetüchtige „Cap San Diego“ als Museumsschiff an der Hamburger Überseebrücke besichtigt werden.

Containerisierung und Übernahmen
1970 bis 1996

Als Mitte der 1960er Jahre die ersten Container in deutschen Häfen gelöscht wurden, herrschte in der Branche eher Skepsis. Bei der Hamburg Süd war man von Anfang an vom Siegeszug der genormten Box überzeugt. Die Columbus Line, die nordamerikanische Tochter der Hamburg Süd, bot bereits ab 1971 Containerdienste zwischen Nordamerika und Australien / Neuseeland an. Mit drei Vollcontainerschiffen, der „Columbus New Zealand“, der „Columbus Australia“ und der „Columbus America“, begann die Containerisierung im Pazifik. Die Containerisierung im Europa – Südamerika Ostküstendienst begann im Jahr 1980 mit den eigens für den Containertransport umgebauten Frachtern „Monte Olivia“ und „Monte Sarmiento“. Die 80er Jahre markierten zugleich auch den Beginn einer intensiven Expansionspolitik der Hamburg Süd mit zahlreichen Übernahmen von Liniendiensten. Den Anfang machten 1986 die Übernahme der letzten Anteile der Deutsche Nah-Ost-Linien und der Erwerb eines 50-prozentigen Anteils an der spanischen Linie Ybarra y Cia, Sudamerica S.A., Sevilla, mit denen sich die Hamburg Süd den Zugang vom Mittelmeer zur Ostküste Südamerikas sicherte. Vier Jahre später erfolgte der Kauf der Rotterdam Zuid-America Lijn (RZAL) mit der dazugehörigen Havenlijn. Im Oktober 1990 erfolgte dann die Übernahme der englischen Furness Withy Group. Mit diesem Schritt etablierte sich die Hamburg Süd in den Verkehren von Europa zur Westküste Südamerikas, zur Ostküste Mittelamerikas und in die Karibik. Im Jahr 1991 wurde dann die schwedische Reederei Laser Lines übernommen, die zur Stärkung der Präsenz in der Karibik und der Westküste Südamerikas beitrug.

Globalisierung und Wachstum
1997 bis 2021

Um die gute Marktposition in ihren Fahrtgebieten weiter auszubauen, übernahm die Hamburg Süd-Gruppe ab 1997 weitere namhafte Linienaktivitäten. Dazu gehören unter anderem die South Seas Steamship und die South Pacific Container Lines im Südpazifik (1999), die Linienaktivitäten der brasilianischen Transroll zwischen Europa und der Ostküste Südamerikas (1999), und die Interamerika-Dienste der amerikanischen Reederei Crowley American Transport im Jahr 2000. Eine besondere Stellung nahm dabei die brasilianische Reederei Aliança ein, die im Jahr 1998 übernommen wurde. Die Aliança ist führend in der Cabotage, das sind die Transporte zwischen den brasilianischen Häfen, die nur Schiffen unter brasilianischer Flagge vorbehalten sind. 2003 folgten die Akquisition der unter dem Markennamen Ellerman betriebenen Liniendienste ins östliche Mittelmeer und nach Indien/Pakistan sowie die Übernahme der Linienaktivitäten von Kien Hung im Asien-Südamerika-Verkehr, sowie nach Süd- und Westafrika. 2006 folgte der Erwerb der Cross Trade Aktivitäten von Fesco zwischen Australien/Neuseeland und Asien bzw. Nordamerika unter dem Namen FANZL Fesco Australien New Zealand Liner Services. Ende 2007 übernahm die Hamburg Süd die Linienaktivitäten von Costa Container Lines vom Mittelmeer, zur Südamerika Ost- und Nordküste, nach Zentralamerika sowie in die Karibik, nach Kanada und nach Kuba. 2014 trat die Reederei-Gruppe in den Verkehr zwischen Asien, Nordeuropa und dem westlichen Mittelmeer sowie Asien und Nordamerika ein. Im ersten Quartal 2015 wurde die Expansionsstrategie mit der Übernahme der Container-Liniendienste von Chilena de Navegación Interoceánica S.A. (CCNI) zwischen der Westküste Südamerikas und Asien, Europa sowie Nordamerika fortgesetzt. Auf dem Markt war die Hamburg Süd-Gruppe zuletzt mit Container- Liniendiensten (110 Schiffe) und in der Trampschifffahrt (60 Schiffe) auf den Weltmeeren präsent. Gleichzeitig wurden bei den Schiffsneubauten zahlreiche ökonomisch und ökologisch wirksame Maßnahmen umgesetzt, die zu einem niedrigeren Treibstoffverbrauch und zu einer Reduktion von Emissionen beitrugen. Nicht nur aufgrund der Akquisitionen, sondern auch bedingt durch ein gezieltes, organisches Wachstum zählte die Hamburg Süd im Jahr 2016 zu den zehn größten Containerreedereien der Welt und war bis zu ihrem Verkauf an die dänische Maersk Gruppe Ende 2017 die zweitgrößte Reederei Deutschlands. Im Laufe der letzten zwei Jahre wurden die Tankeraktivitäten von RAO eingestellt, während die Dry-Bulk-Aktivitäten von RAO (Hamburg), Furness Withy (London und Melbourne) und Aliança Navegação e Logística (Rio de Janeiro) an die China Navigation Company (CNCo), einer Tochtergesellschaft der Swire Gruppe, verkauft wurden. In 2021 setzt die Hamburg Süd ihre strategische Fokussierung auf die Containerlogistik fort und verkauft die Hamburg Süd Reiseagentur an die in Großbritannien ansässige ATPI-Gruppe, einem weltweit führenden Unternehmen für Geschäftsreisen.

Bei Rückfragen wenden Sie sich bitte an:

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg

Eva Graumann

Tel. +49 40 300 92 30-95

E-Mail: e.graumann.extern@imm-hamburg.de


oder

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg

Antje Reineward

Tel. + 49 40 300 92 30-14

E-Mail: a.reineward@imm-hamburg.de


Hamburg, 19. Oktober 2021

Das Internationale Maritime Museum Hamburg zeigt in einem neu gestalteten Bereich alles zum Thema Kühlschifffahrt

Ein neuer Ausstellungs-Bereich zum Thema „Kühlschifffahrt – Transport von verderblichen Gütern“ lockt die
Besucher ins Internationale Maritime Museum Hamburg (IMMH). Seit dem 19. Oktober 2021 wird in diesem
neuen Teil der Ausstellung auf Deck 6 alles zum Thema Kühlschifffahrt am Beispiel der Hamburg Süd präsentiert.

Vom Beginn der Kühlschifffahrt im Jahr 1877 bis heute wird die gesamte Bandbreite der Entwicklung
aufgezeigt und den Besuchern des IMMH anhand von Schiffen und Transportbedingungen anschaulich
dargeboten.

Kühltransporte werden hauptsächlich von den Anbaugebieten der südlichen Hemisphäre in die Industrieländer
der nördlichen Hemisphäre durchgeführt.

Schon früher haben die Vorlieben der Verbraucher auf der ganzen Welt die Handelsrouten der Lebensmittel
bestimmt. Wenn zum Beispiel in einem Teil der Welt die Nachfrage nach einer bestimmten Obstsorte stieg, sind
die Erzeuger auf einem anderen Kontinent schnell dabei, diese Nachfrage zu decken. Heute sind dank der
Kühlschifffahrt viele Obst- und Gemüsesorten das ganze Jahr über verfügbar. Die kontinuierliche Anpassung an
die sich ändernden Kundenwünsche und die damit verbundenen Herausforderungen an den Transport
temperaturempfindlicher Güter und die Ladungspflege haben das sogenannte Reefer-Geschäft in der Schifffahrt
über viele Jahre nachhaltig geprägt.

Die wichtigsten Ladungsgüter, die heute weltweit in temperaturgesteuerten Containern transportiert werden,
sind Obst und Gemüse, Fleisch, Fisch, Meeresfrüchte, Molkereiprodukte, Pharmazeutika und Blumen, wobei
Bananen die wichtigste Kühlladung darstellen. Beim Transport temperaturempfindlicher Güter ist die lückenlose
Einhaltung der Kühlkette entscheidend für die Qualität.

Diese und noch viel mehr Informationen erwarten die Besucher, die sich auch selbst anhand eines interaktiven
Touch Screens ein Bild über die Waren und Warenströme machen können, die für sie von Interesse sind, wie z.
B. Rindfleisch aus Argentinien, Avocados aus Peru oder Weintrauben aus Brasilien.
Ermöglicht wurde der Aufbau dieses neuen Ausstellungs-Bereiches im Internationalen Maritimen Museum
Hamburg durch die Förderung der Dr. August Oetker KG, Bielefeld. Die Hamburg Süd befand sich mehr als acht
Jahrzehnte, bis zu ihrem Verkauf Ende 2017 an die dänische Maersk Gruppe, im Besitz der Familie Oetker.

Bei Rückfragen wenden Sie sich bitte an:

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg
Eva Graumann
Tel. +49 40 300 92 30-95
E-Mail: e.graumann.extern@imm-hamburg.de

oder

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg
Antje Reineward
Tel. + 49 40 300 92 30-14
E-Mail: a.reineward@imm-hamburg.de


Hamburg, 19 October 2021

The International Maritime Museum Hamburg shows everything about reefer shipping in a newly designed area

A new exhibition area on the subject of „Reefer Shipping – Transport of Perishable Goods“ is attracting visitors to the International Maritime Museum Hamburg (IMMH). Since 19 October 2021, this new part of the exhibition on deck 6 will present everything on the subject of reefer shipping, using the Hamburg Süd as an example.

From the beginning of reefer shipping in 1877 to the present day, the entire spectrum of development is shown and vividly presented to visitors to the IMMH using ships and transport conditions.

Reefer transport is mainly carried out from the growing regions of the southern hemisphere to the industrialised countries of the northern hemisphere.

Even in the past, the preferences of consumers around the world determined the trade routes of food. For example, if demand for a certain type of fruit increased in one part of the world, producers on another continent would be quick to meet that demand. Today, thanks to reefer shipping, many fruits and vegetables are available all year round. Continuous adaptation to changing customer demands and the associated challenges of transporting temperature-sensitive goods and cargo care have left a lasting mark on the so-called reefer business in shipping over many years.

The most important cargoes transported in temperature-controlled containers worldwide today are fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, seafood, dairy products, pharmaceuticals and flowers, with bananas being the most important reefer cargo. When transporting temperature-sensitive goods, unbroken compliance with the cold chain is crucial for quality.

This and much more information awaits the visitors, who can also use an interactive touch screen to see for themselves the goods and goods flows that are of interest to them, such as beef from Argentina, avocados from Peru or grapes from Brazil.

The development of this new exhibition area in the International Maritime Museum Hamburg was made possible by the sponsorship of Dr. August Oetker KG, Bielefeld. The Hamburg Süd was owned by the Oetker family for more than eight decades until it was sold to the Danish Maersk Group at the end of 2017.

If you have any queries, please contact:

International Maritime Museum Hamburg

Eva Graumann

Tel. +49 40 300 92 30-95

E-mail: e.graumann.extern@imm-hamburg.de

or

International Maritime Museum Hamburg

Antje Reineward

Tel. + 49 40 300 92 30-14

E-mail: a.reineward@imm-hamburg.de


Hamburg, 28. Oktober 2019

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg mit beeindruckenden neuen Exponaten

Montag, der 28. Oktober 2019 ist ein besonderer Tag in der Geschichte des Internationalen Maritimen Museums Hamburg (IMMH). Für Besucher ist das IMMH an diesem Tag geschlossen, denn mit einer spektakulären Aktion wird die Dauerausstellung des Museums um zahlreiche neue Exponate reicher.

Nach der Ankündigung der Kooperation der Hamburg Süd und dem IMMH für die Erschließung und Präsentation der historischen Sammlung der Hamburg Süd im April 2019 ist es nun soweit – der Einzug der ersten historischen Schiffsmodelle der Hamburg Süd erfolgt per Kran.

Peter Tamm jun. freut sich: „Mit der Übernahme der ersten Schiffsmodelle der legendären CAP ARCONA sowie der CAP POLONIO geht ein lang gehegter Traum meines Vaters, Peter Tamm sen., in Erfüllung.“

Die CAP ARCONA aus dem Jahr 1927 zählt zu den wichtigsten historischen Schiffsmodellen weltweit und wird mit einem Maßstab von 1:37,5 ihren Platz an exponierter Stelle im IMMH erhalten. Genauso wie die CAP POLONIO von 1914 mit einem Maßstab von 1:50. Der Einzug dieser beiden außergewöhnlichen Exponate in das IMMH ist wegen ihrer Größe von 5,40 Metern und 4,00 Metern nur mit aufwendigen Kranarbeiten möglich, um das IMMH anschließend um eine Attraktion reicher zu machen.

Nach der CAP POLONIO, die erst 1916, nach Ausbruch des Krieges  und einem Baustopp Ende 1914, fertiggestellt werden konnte, stand mit 196 Metern Länge, 26 Metern Breite und einem Tiefgang von 8,40 Meter die CAP ARCONA der Hamburg Süd im Jahre 1927 an der Spitze der internationalen Südamerika-Fahrt und wurde aus diesem Grunde auch „Königin des Südatlantiks“ genannt. Kein anderes Schiff konnte in den Disziplinen Größe, Luxus und Geschwindigkeit mit der CAP ARCONA konkurrieren.

Am 3. Mai 1945 wird die Cap Arcona in der Lübecker Bucht von Jagdbombern der Royal Air Force in Brand geschossen. Das Schiff brennt aus und kentert. Das Schiff war zuvor von Karl Kaufmann, dem Gauleiter von Hamburg, für die Räumung des Konzentrationslagers Neuengamme beschlagnahmt worden.  Zum Zeitpunkt des Angriffs befanden sich an Bord rund 5.500 KZ-Häftlinge, weit mehr als die zugelassene Passagierzahl von 850 Menschen. Fast alle verbrennen, kommen in der kalten Ostsee um oder werden von Wachmannschaften erschossen. Mindestens 5.000 Menschen sterben.

Die Kranarbeiten dauern den ganzen Tag an, da außer den beiden beeindruckenden Hamburg Süd-Modellen, noch mehrere größere Exponate der Sammlung Peter Tamm zwischen den Ausstellungsdecks umverteilt werden. Bei dieser logistischen Herausforderung trifft präzise Technik auf hanseatische Baukunst aus dem 19. Jahrhundert. Ein Kran wird ganztags an der Südfassade des Museums eingesetzt, um die größten Exponate zwischen dem Erdgeschoss und den einzelnen Stockwerken bis hin zum 9. Stockwerk zu bewegen.

Die größten Exponate aber, die bei dieser Aktion bewegt werden, sind keine Schiffsmodelle, sondern echte Boote. Die 7 Meter lange UMMA I – der Seenotretter wird im Museumshof umgesetzt, um Platz für eine „neue Nachbarin“ zu schaffen. Das ist die JAMES CAIRD II, die bisher auf Deck 6 des IMMH ausgestellt war. Die JAMES CAIRD II ist eine Replika des Beiboots der Endurance. Mit diesem Schiff unternahm der Polarforscher Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton im Jahr 1914 eine der beeindruckendsten Rettungsaktionen der Geschichte. An Bord dieser Replika, der JAMES CAIRD II wiederholte der deutsche Polarforscher Arved Fuchs im Jahr 2000 Shackletons historische Reise. 

Die Besucher des IMMH dürfen sich nach den aufwendigen Kranarbeiten auf weitere Neuerungen freuen. Auf Deck 8 befinden sich jetzt zwei weitere Großmodelle von historischen Segelschiffen, die DE DAPPERHEYD (um 1799) sowie die MARIA (um 1870). Sie stehen als dreidimensionale Begleiter für die dort ausgestellten Meisterwerke der Marinemalerei.

Auf Deck 9 und auf Deck 6 werden zudem neue beeindruckende Schiffsmodelle, wie z.B. die HAMBURG EXPRESS (1972) von Hapag-Lloyd, die MSC SONIA (2010) sowie die CMA CGM LA PEROUSE (2010) als Beispiele für die zeitgenössische Containerschifffahrt präsentiert. 

Die aufwendige und spektakuläre Aktion zur Umgestaltung der Dauerausstellung ist Teil der kontinuierlichen Optimierung, das Museum für die Besucher aus aller Welt noch interessanter zu gestalten.

Das IMMH befindet sich im Kaispeicher B, einem Gebäude von 1879. Dieses Bauwerk ist der älteste, noch erhaltene Speicher des Hamburger Hafens. Die Fassade wurden ursprünglich mit sogenannten Windentoren gebaut, um Güter von außerhalb des Speichers direkt in alle Stockwerke transportieren zu können.

Zur Kooperation mit der Hamburg Süd

Ziel dieser Kooperation ist, die Geschichte der 1871 gegründeten Hamburg Süd anhand von wichtigen Bildern, Schiffsmodellen, Schriftstücken sowie weiteren Exponaten und Akten aus dem Archiv der breiten Öffentlichkeit zugänglich zu machen.

Im IMMH soll die Geschichte der Hamburg Süd anschaulich nachgezeichnet werden – seit der Gründung während der Auswanderungswelle von Europa nach Nord- und Südamerika in der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts über die bewegten Jahrzehnte zwischen dem Ersten Weltkrieg, der Weltwirtschaftskrise und dem Zweiten Weltkrieg sowie Nachkriegszeit bis hin zur Stückgutfahrt und zum Zeitalter der Containerisierung.

Geplant ist zudem eine große Sonderausstellung zum 150-jährigen Bestehen der Reederei im Jubiläumsjahr 2021. Die historische Sammlung soll darüber hinaus dauerhaft im Internationalen Maritimen Museum, einem der weltweit führenden Museen im maritimen Bereich, zu Forschungszwecken zur Verfügung stehen.

Die Finanzierung der mehrjährigen Vorarbeiten und der Ausstellungen ist durch eine bedeutende Spende der Oetker-Familie sichergestellt, in deren Eigentum sich die Hamburg Süd über acht Jahrzehnte lang befand. 2017 verkaufte die Familie die Reederei an die heutige Gesellschafterin Maersk, die weltgrößte Linienreederei mit Sitz in Kopenhagen.

___________________________________________________________

Kontakt: Eva Graumann Kommunikationsberatung, Mobil: +49 175 1865343

Email: e.graumann.extern@imm-hamburg.de

23. April 2019

Pressemitteilung von Hamburg Süd:


Hamburg Süd und Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg schließen Kooperation

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg Süd Reederei Schiffsminiaturen Miniaturen Reederei Schifffahrt Pressemitteilung Frachtschiff Containerschiff Schifffahrt Schiffsmodelle Modelle Modellbau Shipping Ship freighter cargoship containership
Einige der Hamburg Süd Schiffsminiaturen der Sammlung Peter Tamm im Internationalen Maritimen Museum Hamburg. (Foto: Internationales MAritimes Museum Hamburg)

Historisches Archiv der Hamburg Süd wird erschlossen – Umfassende Ausstellung zum 150-jährigen Bestehen der Reederei im Jahr 2021 geplant – Finanzierung des Forschungsvorhabens durch Spende der Oetker-Familie.

Hamburg, 23. April 2019. Die Hamburg Süd und das Internationale Maritime Museum Hamburg (IMMH) haben eine Kooperation für die Erschließung und Präsentation der historischen Sammlung der Hamburger Reederei beschlossen. Ziel ist es, die Geschichte der 1871 gegründeten Hamburg Süd anhand von wichtigen Bildern, Schiffsmodellen, Schriftstücken sowie weiteren Exponaten und Akten aus dem Archiv in Form einer Dauerausstellung der breiten Öffentlichkeit zugänglich zu machen. Geplant ist zudem eine große Sonderausstellung zum 150-jährigen Bestehen der Reederei im Jubiläumsjahr 2021. Die historische Sammlung soll darüber hinaus dauerhaft im Internationalen Maritimen Museum, einem der weltweit führenden Museen im maritimen Bereich, zu Forschungszwecken zur Verfügung stehen.

Die Finanzierung der mehrjährigen Vorarbeiten und der Ausstellungen ist durch eine bedeutende Spende der Oetker-Familie sichergestellt, in deren Eigentum sich die Hamburg Süd über acht Jahrzehnte lang befand. 2017 verkaufte die Familie die Reederei an die heutige Gesellschafterin Maersk, die weltgrößte Linienreederei mit Sitz in Kopenhagen. Maersk unterstützt die Kooperation ebenfalls.

Im Internationalen Maritimen Museum soll die Geschichte der Hamburg Süd anschaulich nachgezeichnet werden – seit der Gründung während der Auswanderungswelle von Europa nach Nord- und Südamerika in der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts über die bewegten Jahrzehnte zwischen dem Ersten Weltkrieg, der Weltwirtschaftskrise und dem Zweiten Weltkrieg sowie Nachkriegszeit bis hin zur Stückgutfahrt und zum Zeitalter der Containerisierung. Die Entwicklung der Hamburg Süd über diese eineinhalb Jahrhunderte steht dabei exemplarisch für die Geschichte zahlreicher Linienreedereien aus jener Epoche. So sind in den Anfangsjahren die Schicksale vieler Tausend Auswanderer eng mit dem Namen Hamburg Süd verbunden, deren meist südamerikanische Nachfahren heute noch Anfragen zu Passagierlisten an das Hamburger Unternehmen richten. Den Gründern der Hamburg Süd war zudem ein verlässlicher Liniendienst zwischen Europa und Südamerika für die Beförderung von Gütern wichtig. Damals waren die Luxusliner der großen Reedereien die einzige Möglichkeit, von Kontinent zu Kontinent zu gelangen. Erst mit der Einführung der Passagierluftfahrt verlagerte sich der Fokus der Schifffahrtsunternehmen mehr und mehr auf den Transport von Waren aller Art.

Die Hamburg Süd ist in diesem Bereich berühmt für die hohe Qualität ihrer Transporte von Lebensmitteln wie Südfrüchten, Kaffee und hochwertigem Fleisch. In Märkten wie Brasilien, Argentinien, Chile, Kolumbien, aber auch Australien und Neuseeland gehört das Unternehmen zu den Marktführern. Die Güter werden von dort vor allem in den klassischen Nord-Süd-Fahrtgebieten nach Europa, Asien und Nordamerika transportiert.

„Von der Auswanderung aus Europa bis zur Containerschifffahrt hat die Hamburg Süd wichtige globale Entwicklungen mitgestaltet, so wie auch das Unternehmen von diesen Prozessen geprägt wurde. Dieses reiche geschichtliche Erbe sowie die Zusammenhänge rund um die internationale Schifffahrt des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts wollen wir mit unserer Spende für ein breites Publikum anschaulich machen“, sagte Dr. August Oetker stellvertretend für die Familie Oetker.

„Ich bin der Hamburg Süd und damit auch der Familie Oetker durch meine berufliche Laufbahn sehr verbunden. So freut es mich persönlich und insbesondere als Vorstand der Peter Tamm Sen. Stiftung, dass es zu dieser Kooperation kommt. Die beschlossene Übergabe der historischen Sammlung ist für uns eine große Ehre. Das Internationale Maritime Museum sieht sich in der Verantwortung, die Geschichte des Hamburger Hafens und der Reedereien als Kulturgut zu bewahren, wissenschaftlich zu erforschen und dem nationalen und internationalen Publikum zu vermitteln. Die Sammlung der Hamburg Süd und die Spende der Familie Oetker stellt für uns eine große Bereicherung sowohl in musealer als auch in wissenschaftlicher Hinsicht dar“, erläuterte Peter Tamm, Vorstand des Internationalen Maritimen Museums.

„Die Geschichte der Hamburg Süd und die vielen Einzelgeschichten, die aus dem reichen Erbe der letzten fast 150 Jahre hervorgegangen sind, sind genau das: Es sind Hamburg-Geschichten und es sind Hamburg Süd-Geschichten. Die Archive und Artefakte, die all diese Geschichten erzählen, sollten dort bleiben, wo sie hingehören. Wir schätzen die Bemühungen der Oetker-Familie und des Internationalen Maritimen Museums, die Geschichte des Unternehmens zu bewahren und zu präsentieren, und freuen uns darauf, diesen Einsatz zu unterstützen“, sagte Søren Skou, CEO von A.P. Møller – Mærsk A/S.

„Unsere Wurzeln liegen zwischen Elbe und Alster. Die Hamburg Süd ist und bleibt fester Bestandteil des maritimen Clusters in Hamburg sowie einer der größten maritimen Arbeitgeber der Stadt. Mit dieser Kooperation und den geplanten Ausstellungen wird dies künftig nach außen noch deutlicher sichtbar“, unterstrich Dr. Arnt Vespermann, CEO der Hamburg Süd.

Die Hamburg Süd:

Die Hamburg Südamerikanische Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft A/S & Co KG – kurz Hamburg Süd – gehört zu den zehn größten Containerreederei-Marken weltweit und ist ein Teil von Maersk Line, dem weltgrößten Containerschiff-fahrtsunternehmen. Erfahrene Mitarbeiter in 250 Büros in mehr als 100 Ländern über den Globus verteilt sorgen dafür, dass Kunden individuell auf sie zugeschnittene Logistiklösungen erhalten. Die im Jahr 1871 gegründete Hamburg Süd ist mit ihrer brasilianischen Tochtergesellschaft Aliança als Qualitätsmarke global präsent. Die Hamburg Süd zählt zu den Top-5-Reefer-Marken, gehört zu den Marktführern in den Nord-Süd-Verkehren und bedient alle wichtigen Ost-West-Verkehre. Hohe Qualitätsstandards, ein verlässlicher Service und eine persönliche Note sind integrale Bestandteile der Markenwerte der Hamburg Süd. Mehr Informationen im Internet unter: hamburgsud.com.

Kontakt für Presseanfragen: Hamburg Süd | Corporate Communications | Christiane Krämer
Willy-Brandt-Straße 59–65 | 20457 Hamburg | Telefon +49 40 3705-2284 | Fax +49 40 3705-2649
christiane.kraemer@hamburgsud.com | www.hamburgsud.com/press



Zum Presse Archiv.

Bereitgestellte Texte sind nur zum privaten Gebrauch und für journalistische Zwecke. Für andere Nutzung ist eine schriftliche Genehmigung durch das IMMH erforderlich.